Entries Matching: DRM

United States Copyright Office: Ripping is Illegal

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Today the Register of Copyrights and the Librarian of Congress announced the 1201 exemptions.  You may remember that the 1201 review is the triannual process where organizations, communities, and individuals request permission to circumvent Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies that prevent them from doing otherwise perfectly legal things.  This time around, Public Knowledge requested an exemption that would allow people to rip DVDs they already own in order to transfer the movie to a device that cannot play DVDs (like a tablet).

That request was rejected.  Furthermore, the Register and the Librarian explained that they were unconvinced that space shifting was fair use at all.  That has huge implications well beyond people who want to watch the movies they own on DVD on their iPad.

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DRM on 3D Printers is a Big Deal. Nathan Myhrvold’s Patent is Not.

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Recently, Antonio Regalado at Technology Review identified a patent on Digital Rights Management (DRM) for 3D printing.  The patent, granted to Nathan Myhrvold's company Intellectual Ventures (IV), initiated a wave of discussion about DRM and 3D printing.  While this is a discussion that is worth having, the existence of the patent it not particularly relevant to it.

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Failing to understand the needs of the 21st century: The TPP’s flawed digital locks scheme

DRM, TPP

For comprehensive information about the TPP please visit tppinfo.org.

The 14th round of negotiations for the Transpacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) started today. The TPP is being touted as a “21st century" trade agreement, implying that the TPP’s provisions would reflect an understanding of the needs of 21st century citizens. With respect to copyright, this should mean that the agreement would reflect an understanding not only of the tools copyright owners need to protect their rights but also an understanding of the flexibilities that various users (like hobbyists, cultural institutions like libraries, archives and museums, and information and communication technology companies) would need to use digital material. Yet what we know of the TPP, at best, reflects little understanding of the needs of these communities.

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I don’t always rip my DVDs, but when I do I prefer to do it myself

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It looks like the ridiculous “drive-to-the-store-and-pay-to-have-us-rip-your-dvds” service that was hinted at last week was not a joke. Today Wal-Mart and the major movie studios are rolling it out for real.

As we have already detailed, this program is insulting to the public and embarrassing to movie studios, but let’s go a bit deeper. We should be clear about one thing – there is nothing inherently wrong with movie studios and Wal-Mart offering people a service that lets them upload their movies to a cloud service. Furthermore, there is nothing wrong with charging them for the privilege.

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Tell The USTR Not to Do Big Content’s Bidding

The United States Trade Representative (USTR) is asking for public comment in its Special 301 inquiry for 2012. Special 301 is an annual report that the USTR compiles listing countries that allegedly fail to provide adequate and effective protection for intellectual property rights of US persons. As we have said before, this report has turned into an exercise that arm-twists countries into instituting laws and policies that serve the interests of big content even where these policies hurt the free expression and due process rights of citizens.

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